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CASS 2012, Ba Fine Art Degree Show.
Private View:
12th June 2012 18:00-22:00
Open Daily:
12th June Tuesday           18:00-22:00
13th June Wednesday       10:00-20:00
14th June Thursday          10:00-20:00
15th June Friday               10:00-20:00
16th June Saturday           11:00-17:00
17th June Sunday             11:00-16:30
London Metropolitan University
Central House
59-63 Whitechapel Highstreet
E1 7PF

CASS 2012, Ba Fine Art Degree Show.

Private View:

12th June 2012 18:00-22:00

Open Daily:

12th June Tuesday           18:00-22:00

13th June Wednesday       10:00-20:00

14th June Thursday          10:00-20:00

15th June Friday               10:00-20:00

16th June Saturday           11:00-17:00

17th June Sunday             11:00-16:30

London Metropolitan University

Central House

59-63 Whitechapel Highstreet

E1 7PF

(Source: cass2012catalogue, via cass2012catalogue-r-z)

Jon Long 
‘The artist is void void void void’, 2012
Acrylic and edding pen of canvas
40 x 75 cm
A committed subscriber to Ludwig Wittgenstein’s proposal that: “a good and serious philosophical work can be written entirely in the form of jokes” Jon Long’s work addresses issues such as the pitfalls of celebrity culture, the unnecessary pressures put upon children, and the worrying state of a society that allows Jeremy Kyle to not only continue broadcasting, but to continue breathing.
Long believes that making a subject laughable helps us to remove ourselves emotionally from the issue, so that we may view it more objectively. It is also important to Long that he does so in a way that allows a large cross section of the audience to both understand and enjoy the work.
His work includes t-shirt sloganism, painting, and audio pieces. His project for this show is an installation that incorporates all of these elements and is entitled: ‘The artist’s pop-shop is void void void void’.
His hobbies include long walks on the beach and writing about himself in third person.
www.bowboy.tumblr.com
jonmarklong@yahoo.co.uk

Jon Long 

‘The artist is void void void void’, 2012

Acrylic and edding pen of canvas

40 x 75 cm

A committed subscriber to Ludwig Wittgenstein’s proposal that: “a good and serious philosophical work can be written entirely in the form of jokes” Jon Long’s work addresses issues such as the pitfalls of celebrity culture, the unnecessary pressures put upon children, and the worrying state of a society that allows Jeremy Kyle to not only continue broadcasting, but to continue breathing.

Long believes that making a subject laughable helps us to remove ourselves emotionally from the issue, so that we may view it more objectively. It is also important to Long that he does so in a way that allows a large cross section of the audience to both understand and enjoy the work.

His work includes t-shirt sloganism, painting, and audio pieces. His project for this show is an installation that incorporates all of these elements and is entitled: ‘The artist’s pop-shop is void void void void’.

His hobbies include long walks on the beach and writing about himself in third person.

www.bowboy.tumblr.com

jonmarklong@yahoo.co.uk

Kitty Junkbrother
'The Tower of Psycho Babble’ Kitty Junkbrother works on large installations, sculptures, painting and illustrative works incorporating an obsessive use of psychedelic colour, repetition and obsession. Anthropomorphic creatures, largely influenced by Japanese manga and animation, blend together in a metamorphosis of mythologies and folklores, exploring the narratives with a certain level of kitsch ‘naffness’ that reveres an appreciation of nostalgia.There are many references to the advent of computerization and human interaction with technology suggesting narrative to dystopian post apocalyptic cyber realities further leading to a homage to comic book culture and the concepts of far-fetched scenario and perceptive. The end result of all these elements create an orchestrated chaos of psychedelia and form to remove the spectator and perhaps more so the artist herself from the peripheral identity of conformity.
iamkategilchrist@gmail.com

Kitty Junkbrother

'The Tower of Psycho Babble’ 

Kitty Junkbrother works on large installations, sculptures, painting and illustrative works incorporating an obsessive use of psychedelic colour, repetition and obsession. Anthropomorphic creatures, largely influenced by Japanese manga and animation, blend together in a metamorphosis of mythologies and folklores, exploring the narratives with a certain level of kitsch ‘naffness’ that reveres an appreciation of nostalgia.
There are many references to the advent of computerization and human interaction with technology suggesting narrative to dystopian post apocalyptic cyber realities further leading to a homage to comic book culture and the concepts of far-fetched scenario and perceptive. The end result of all these elements create an orchestrated chaos of psychedelia and form to remove the spectator and perhaps more so the artist herself from the peripheral identity of conformity.

iamkategilchrist@gmail.com

(Source: cass2012catalogue, via cass2012catalogue-r-z)

Jessica Proto
'Memento Mori'
Jessica Proto is a photographer that started her photography career in 2008. Photography is a discipline that has interested her for some years now because as she says “it’s a beautiful way to express your self and capture special moments and memories”.
In the “Memento Mori” project she has used an actual body bag to illustrate death and issues relating to dead people, but she explains, “because of how it’s illustrated, the photos can look very funny, but the theme itself is rather important and vital.” Proto’s research indicates that the phrase “Memento Mori” comes from Latin and is translated as “Remember your mortality”, “Remember you must die” or “Remember you will die”. The phrase often refers to a genre of different artworks that share the same purpose, which is to remind people of their mortality.
Proto’s photographs reflect upon the normalization of death in today’s society and how accustomed people are to it through the mass media. She argues that we, the spectators, have become impassive when reading and hearing about someone dying. Even if death is a natural occurrence in life, it doesn’t mean that we shouldn’t be careful about its consequences.
jespro.wordpress.com
jes.proto@gmail.com

Jessica Proto

'Memento Mori'

Jessica Proto is a photographer that started her photography career in 2008. Photography is a discipline that has interested her for some years now because as she says “it’s a beautiful way to express your self and capture special moments and memories”.

In the “Memento Mori” project she has used an actual body bag to illustrate death and issues relating to dead people, but she explains, “because of how it’s illustrated, the photos can look very funny, but the theme itself is rather important and vital.” Proto’s research indicates that the phrase “Memento Mori” comes from Latin and is translated as “Remember your mortality”, “Remember you must die” or “Remember you will die”. The phrase often refers to a genre of different artworks that share the same purpose, which is to remind people of their mortality.

Proto’s photographs reflect upon the normalization of death in today’s society and how accustomed people are to it through the mass media. She argues that we, the spectators, have become impassive when reading and hearing about someone dying. Even if death is a natural occurrence in life, it doesn’t mean that we shouldn’t be careful about its consequences.

jespro.wordpress.com

jes.proto@gmail.com

Jane Prentice
'Sisters'
60 x 36cm
My paintings are the spaces where my subjects live. The people in my paintings are psychological landscapes, shaped by their life experience. My practice is about relating their narratives and translating their condition of being, using the medium of paint. I do not aspire to photorealism, rather to convey a reality about my subjects using expressive and intuitive marks, often led by the medium itself. My work is experiential rather than theoretically perceived. Where my paintings have groups of people, although they each have an individual narrative, these tend to be sub- texts to a wider narrative which is based in social commentary.
janeprentice345@yahoo.co.uk

Jane Prentice

'Sisters'

60 x 36cm

My paintings are the spaces where my subjects live. The people in my paintings are psychological landscapes, shaped by their life experience. My practice is about relating their narratives and translating their condition of being, using the medium of paint. I do not aspire to photorealism, rather to convey a reality about my subjects using expressive and intuitive marks, often led by the medium itself. My work is experiential rather than theoretically perceived. Where my paintings have groups of people, although they each have an individual narrative, these tend to be sub- texts to a wider narrative which is based in social commentary.

janeprentice345@yahoo.co.uk

Michael Piper
'Streets in the Sky'
Scott House C Type Matt Print, 40x30 Mounted on Dibond.
Michael’s current work are typologies which combines two subjects:- The homeless and social housing. Separately the projects were named Hundreds of Windows Hundreds of Lives and The Look Just like You. While shooting he realised that they were linked and decided to combine both projects under the title Street’s in the Sky. They Look Just Like You is an project inspired by the work of Jacob Riis, Michael has tried not to glamourise or turn his sitters into heroic examples of the poor.  He has tried to hunanise his sitters by engaging and photographing them in their own environment. 
Hundreds of Windows Hundreds of Lives looks at social housing namely tower blocks, influenced by the Bermd and Hilla Becher who captured disappearing architecture in Europe and America. Although tower blocks are not completely disappearing from the landscape, Michael feels that these brutalist structures which where once thought of as the new utopian solution to help London finally end its housing shortage have become more associated with crime, poor living conditions, anti social behavior and reported as not fit for purpose unless inhabited by the upwardly mobile. London based photographer Michael Piper combines together projects dealing with social housing and homelessness.
In his practice he address two questions; that social housing is seen as inferior, and the other question being are they still useful for all members of society? Michael’s  homeless images reference the work of earlier documentary photographer’s such as Jacob Riis. Michael has added a modern contemporary twist by shooting using modern colour media. 
www.michaelpiper.co.uk
Photomichaelpiper@gmail.com

Michael Piper

'Streets in the Sky'

Scott House C Type Matt Print, 40x30 Mounted on Dibond.

Michael’s current work are typologies which combines two subjects:- The homeless and social housing. Separately the projects were named Hundreds of Windows Hundreds of Lives and The Look Just like You. While shooting he realised that they were linked and decided to combine both projects under the title Street’s in the Sky. They Look Just Like You is an project inspired by the work of Jacob Riis, Michael has tried not to glamourise or turn his sitters into heroic examples of the poor.  He has tried to hunanise his sitters by engaging and photographing them in their own environment. 

Hundreds of Windows Hundreds of Lives looks at social housing namely tower blocks, influenced by the Bermd and Hilla Becher who captured disappearing architecture in Europe and America. Although tower blocks are not completely disappearing from the landscape, Michael feels that these brutalist structures which where once thought of as the new utopian solution to help London finally end its housing shortage have become more associated with crime, poor living conditions, anti social behavior and reported as not fit for purpose unless inhabited by the upwardly mobile. London based photographer Michael Piper combines together projects dealing with social housing and homelessness.

In his practice he address two questions; that social housing is seen as inferior, and the other question being are they still useful for all members of society? Michael’s  homeless images reference the work of earlier documentary photographer’s such as Jacob Riis. Michael has added a modern contemporary twist by shooting using modern colour media. 

www.michaelpiper.co.uk

Photomichaelpiper@gmail.com

Melissa Pender
‘New River Dissolving’ 2012
Photopolymer Etching
40 x 36 cm
Utopian ideas are intrinsic to the work of Melissa Pender. Her practice is about issues that interest her in a political sense, specifically ideas of public and private space. These concerns focus on the tension between the modernist dream and the reality of the current housing crisis. Her work includes camera-less photography, painting, screen prints and etchings. The artist is both attracted to modernist architecture with its historical promise and questions how these ideas fit into the landscape of London today. She has investigated a housing estate - The New River Development in North London. The modernist style of architecture used in the estate can be seen as nostalgic and the artist uses pinhole camera- less photography techniques to represent a type of aesthetic production. The photo-etchings reveal a fragmentary existence; a slowing down of time and the resulting images might be appearing or gradually evolving. The images capture a place that is familiar but seem caught between a description and an imagined existence.
www.melissapender.com
mpender1@hotmail.com

Melissa Pender

‘New River Dissolving’ 2012

Photopolymer Etching

40 x 36 cm

Utopian ideas are intrinsic to the work of Melissa Pender. Her practice is about issues that interest her in a political sense, specifically ideas of public and private space. These concerns focus on the tension between the modernist dream and the reality of the current housing crisis. Her work includes camera-less photography, painting, screen prints and etchings. The artist is both attracted to modernist architecture with its historical promise and questions how these ideas fit into the landscape of London today. She has investigated a housing estate - The New River Development in North London. The modernist style of architecture used in the estate can be seen as nostalgic and the artist uses pinhole camera- less photography techniques to represent a type of aesthetic production. The photo-etchings reveal a fragmentary existence; a slowing down of time and the resulting images might be appearing or gradually evolving. The images capture a place that is familiar but seem caught between a description and an imagined existence.

www.melissapender.com

mpender1@hotmail.com

Robyn Peatfield
'Love & Discipline'
04:00
Love & Disipline is a video short, filmed and directed by installation artist Robyn Peatfield. Using the medium and influences of the times and era in which she is most interested in, being underground fashion, music and lifestyle. This 4 minute film celebrates the art of rebellion, obnoxious revelling and the feminism of today. Using herself as the starring role, and creating another character of a seedy nature,using locations such as back alleys and toilets. The outcome however not portraying herself as the submissive one, but highly confident with body image and private lifestyle. Steering away from taboos, but adopting the cliché in a tongue and cheek manner. The video itself is highly influenced by the late Leigh Bowery, the switch of revealing costumes and bondage props, almost a shrine and rememberence of revolutionary years. 

Robyn Peatfield

'Love & Discipline'

04:00

Love & Disipline is a video short, filmed and directed by installation artist Robyn Peatfield. Using the medium and influences of the times and era in which she is most interested in, being underground fashion, music and lifestyle. This 4 minute film celebrates the art of rebellion, obnoxious revelling and the feminism of today. Using herself as the starring role, and creating another character of a seedy nature,using locations such as back alleys and toilets. The outcome however not portraying herself as the submissive one, but highly confident with body image and private lifestyle. Steering away from taboos, but adopting the cliché in a tongue and cheek manner. The video itself is highly influenced by the late Leigh Bowery, the switch of revealing costumes and bondage props, almost a shrine and rememberence of revolutionary years. 

Hannah Ellen Patching
'Sleep it off Lady’
Chip board, Enamel paint, Plaster, Potplant, Placticine, Hanging Basket, Hat Stand
An elusive marriage of literary references and sculptural mannerisms, Hannah Patching’s practice navigates the accoutrement of women’s lives and investigates social relations through ornament. 
Trinket, knick-knack, bauble; these are words which tickle the tongue when browsing the ceramic things which clutter Patching’s installations; things which smell of cheap museum shops and sound like the clatter of tourist pennies. But does this debased vocabulary belie the cultural significance of such objects? Memento, souvenir, keepsake; perhaps this trinity is more appropriate for it hints at use which strives beyond mere tinsel. But if mementos, mementos of what and mementos of whom?
hannahpatching/blogspot.co.uk
hannah.e.patching@gmail.com

Hannah Ellen Patching

'Sleep it off Lady’

Chip board, Enamel paint, Plaster, Potplant, Placticine, Hanging Basket, Hat Stand

An elusive marriage of literary references and sculptural mannerisms, Hannah Patching’s practice navigates the accoutrement of women’s lives and investigates social relations through ornament. 

Trinket, knick-knack, bauble; these are words which tickle the tongue when browsing the ceramic things which clutter Patching’s installations; things which smell of cheap museum shops and sound like the clatter of tourist pennies. But does this debased vocabulary belie the cultural significance of such objects? Memento, souvenir, keepsake; perhaps this trinity is more appropriate for it hints at use which strives beyond mere tinsel. But if mementos, mementos of what and mementos of whom?

hannahpatching/blogspot.co.uk

hannah.e.patching@gmail.com

Even Ovnan
'Chair upside down, outside…'
Project “Inverted”, is first and foremost about political corruption, but still carries large amounts of creativity and photographic thinking. Even is playing a lot with the idea of distraction and curiosity, which is a key factor in the photos presented. He also plays with the illusion of being able to create something unknown into something known by means of associations and psychological games. The political message deals with hypocrisy, with a view to a freer society desire. Where rules do not necessarily are to be broken, but maintained in loosened reins, and freer sense.
http://evenovnan.com
even@evenovnan.com

Even Ovnan

'Chair upside down, outside…'

Project “Inverted”, is first and foremost about political corruption, but still carries large amounts of creativity and photographic thinking. Even is playing a lot with the idea of distraction and curiosity, which is a key factor in the photos presented. He also plays with the illusion of being able to create something unknown into something known by means of associations and psychological games. The political message deals with hypocrisy, with a view to a freer society desire. Where rules do not necessarily are to be broken, but maintained in loosened reins, and freer sense.

http://evenovnan.com

even@evenovnan.com

Gunhild Martinsen Ohna
'Virtual Killer'
C – Type Print
100 x 70 cm
Gunhild Martinsen Ohna creates artistic photography that simulates reality. Her work consists of a series of images where each image is constructed of multiple images. The work is based on different horrible, religious stories that narrate incidents of manslaughter cases in a kitsch way through the killer’s point of view. With this perspective she enters a modern view of an old and traditional theme with a new problematic area: “Virtual killing in a virtual world of gaming”. As an artist she is looking at problematic areas in society. Especially the role of religion in our modern world is a complex and difficult area that I feel should be more enlightened. As she is showing the darker side of religion she raises the question, “Why does society censure stories?” Her works talk about notions relating to the moral lines of gaming and the idea of people engaging in killing in the virtual world. Where is the border between reality and virtuality?” As a videogame she want the viewers to “see” her work, but to interact with it so they feel like they are not just viewing the act of something but almost perpetuating it, as if they were a virtual killer.
www.gmohna.com

Gunhild Martinsen Ohna

'Virtual Killer'

C – Type Print

100 x 70 cm

Gunhild Martinsen Ohna creates artistic photography that simulates reality. Her work consists of a series of images where each image is constructed of multiple images. The work is based on different horrible, religious stories that narrate incidents of manslaughter cases in a kitsch way through the killer’s point of view. With this perspective she enters a modern view of an old and traditional theme with a new problematic area: “Virtual killing in a virtual world of gaming”. As an artist she is looking at problematic areas in society. Especially the role of religion in our modern world is a complex and difficult area that I feel should be more enlightened. As she is showing the darker side of religion she raises the question, “Why does society censure stories?” Her works talk about notions relating to the moral lines of gaming and the idea of people engaging in killing in the virtual world. Where is the border between reality and virtuality?” As a videogame she want the viewers to “see” her work, but to interact with it so they feel like they are not just viewing the act of something but almost perpetuating it, as if they were a virtual killer.

www.gmohna.com

Karima Ockba
'Jaded alice'
Oil on Canvas
38 x 38
This art project takes you the viewer into a grey windowless life where I had only my imagination to play with. It’s a journey of survival from childhood to a completely new struggle for survival in adulthood. The artwork adorned on the walls is my imagination as a 9-year-old child, where there was no TV, no Radio and very little food or sunlight. Where the fear of chemical weapons and the acrid stench of burning oil fields were the only inspiration I had to feed my senses and imagination. At the end of this corridor you’ll find a projected image surrounded by further artwork depicting my life as a modern day Muslim girl, alone in a big city, away from family and broke, fighting for survival to accomplish her new dreams to study Art in London. 
Art to me is more than just an expression; I have sacrificed my morals, my body and my soul. In the art space there will be large collages about 8x4. And a projector playing a video I had made up appropriate for the subject, and a few bunny lamps that represent the innocent and sexual side of myself. It will all be put in to a narrow small corridor shaped boxed that will be dark and dull to represent the claustrophobic environment I lived in during the Kuwait/Iraq war.
karimaockba@yahoo.co.uk

Karima Ockba

'Jaded alice'

Oil on Canvas

38 x 38

This art project takes you the viewer into a grey windowless life where I had only my imagination to play with. It’s a journey of survival from childhood to a completely new struggle for survival in adulthood. The artwork adorned on the walls is my imagination as a 9-year-old child, where there was no TV, no Radio and very little food or sunlight. Where the fear of chemical weapons and the acrid stench of burning oil fields were the only inspiration I had to feed my senses and imagination. At the end of this corridor you’ll find a projected image surrounded by further artwork depicting my life as a modern day Muslim girl, alone in a big city, away from family and broke, fighting for survival to accomplish her new dreams to study Art in London.

Art to me is more than just an expression; I have sacrificed my morals, my body and my soul. In the art space there will be large collages about 8x4. And a projector playing a video I had made up appropriate for the subject, and a few bunny lamps that represent the innocent and sexual side of myself. It will all be put in to a narrow small corridor shaped boxed that will be dark and dull to represent the claustrophobic environment I lived in during the Kuwait/Iraq war.

karimaockba@yahoo.co.uk

Thomas O’Ryan
'Audrey's Boobs'
Oil on canvas
My work aims to shed light on how modern technology in the ‘Information age’ has distorted how we perceive things, both physically and emotionally. It points out the flaws in our living habits and social constructs created by mass media and mainstream technology, and deconstructs them in a purposefully ironic and unforgiving manner; much like the media circus itself. The work is self knowingly rejecting accepted contemporary values and is intentionally iconoclastic in the way that it deals with its conventional subject matter. Adopting this tone, which is born out of my own disbelief and disillusion with many aspects of consumerist society, gives the work a brash but playful quality. This allows the viewer to not only laugh at the brazen, technophobic opinions of my adopted artist persona, but to consider them as well.
Contextually, the project is set upon the background of today: The ‘Digital age’. An age in which tangible, soulful technology and creative independent media are rapidly becoming extinct. From these realisations a nameless persona was formed; a staunch and reclusive technophobe, whom I channelled when writing and painting. There is an air of nostalgia in the work, a pining for a romanticised image of life in the past – without the constant distraction of social networking/gaming/mobilecommunication/television. My denial and rejection of these conventions of modern society convey a Punk or anti-establishment ethos and this is also apparent in the work through the appropriation and defacement of renowned iconography, which I have ‘borrowed’ as a vehicle for my themes.

Thomas O’Ryan

'Audrey's Boobs'

Oil on canvas

My work aims to shed light on how modern technology in the ‘Information age’ has distorted how we perceive things, both physically and emotionally. It points out the flaws in our living habits and social constructs created by mass media and mainstream technology, and deconstructs them in a purposefully ironic and unforgiving manner; much like the media circus itself. The work is self knowingly rejecting accepted contemporary values and is intentionally iconoclastic in the way that it deals with its conventional subject matter. Adopting this tone, which is born out of my own disbelief and disillusion with many aspects of consumerist society, gives the work a brash but playful quality. This allows the viewer to not only laugh at the brazen, technophobic opinions of my adopted artist persona, but to consider them as well.

Contextually, the project is set upon the background of today: The ‘Digital age’. An age in which tangible, soulful technology and creative independent media are rapidly becoming extinct. From these realisations a nameless persona was formed; a staunch and reclusive technophobe, whom I channelled when writing and painting. There is an air of nostalgia in the work, a pining for a romanticised image of life in the past – without the constant distraction of social networking/gaming/mobilecommunication/television. My denial and rejection of these conventions of modern society convey a Punk or anti-establishment ethos and this is also apparent in the work through the appropriation and defacement of renowned iconography, which I have ‘borrowed’ as a vehicle for my themes.

Fiona Nusum
‘All that glitters is…’
Screen Print
50 x 70cm
Fiona Nusum works as a printmaker developing her artistic ability through screen-printing. She has well constituted frameworks that focus on the theme of defamiliarization indicated by aspects of identity and perception through comparisons and juxtaposition. This artistic technique forces the audience to see common things in an unfamiliar or odd way. The artist’s series of hand-finished prints titled ‘Disposition’ capture the technical versatility and physical characteristics of screen-printing as well as the temperament of subjects. She looks at the role of appearance and identity closely linked with fashion and stereotypical relationships and perceptions between the two elements. Nusum is inspired by the power of imagination and its ability to transcend circumstance and reality, underlining the effects of re-appropriated material that create alternative contexts.
As a practitioner, the artist hopes to challenge the viewer by including evocative components, which question depicted authority. The viewer is forced to reassess the way in which they view the work and to decide what elements are dominant, if any at all, and where and why our attention is drawn to certain areas. They will become aware of the familiarity within the work and their own private connection, while evolving an irregular insight and transforming their initial perception. 
fiona_nusum@hotmail.com

Fiona Nusum

‘All that glitters is…’

Screen Print

50 x 70cm

Fiona Nusum works as a printmaker developing her artistic ability through screen-printing. She has well constituted frameworks that focus on the theme of defamiliarization indicated by aspects of identity and perception through comparisons and juxtaposition. This artistic technique forces the audience to see common things in an unfamiliar or odd way. The artist’s series of hand-finished prints titled ‘Disposition’ capture the technical versatility and physical characteristics of screen-printing as well as the temperament of subjects. She looks at the role of appearance and identity closely linked with fashion and stereotypical relationships and perceptions between the two elements. Nusum is inspired by the power of imagination and its ability to transcend circumstance and reality, underlining the effects of re-appropriated material that create alternative contexts.

As a practitioner, the artist hopes to challenge the viewer by including evocative components, which question depicted authority. The viewer is forced to reassess the way in which they view the work and to decide what elements are dominant, if any at all, and where and why our attention is drawn to certain areas. They will become aware of the familiarity within the work and their own private connection, while evolving an irregular insight and transforming their initial perception. 

fiona_nusum@hotmail.com

CASS 2012, Ba Fine Art Degree Show.
Private View:
12th June 2012 18:00-22:00
Open Daily:
12th June Tuesday           18:00-22:00
13th June Wednesday       10:00-20:00
14th June Thursday          10:00-20:00
15th June Friday               10:00-20:00
16th June Saturday           11:00-17:00
17th June Sunday             11:00-16:30
London Metropolitan University
Central House
59-63 Whitechapel Highstreet
E1 7PF

CASS 2012, Ba Fine Art Degree Show.

Private View:

12th June 2012 18:00-22:00

Open Daily:

12th June Tuesday           18:00-22:00

13th June Wednesday       10:00-20:00

14th June Thursday          10:00-20:00

15th June Friday               10:00-20:00

16th June Saturday           11:00-17:00

17th June Sunday             11:00-16:30

London Metropolitan University

Central House

59-63 Whitechapel Highstreet

E1 7PF

(Source: cass2012catalogue, via cass2012catalogue-r-z)

Jon Long 
‘The artist is void void void void’, 2012
Acrylic and edding pen of canvas
40 x 75 cm
A committed subscriber to Ludwig Wittgenstein’s proposal that: “a good and serious philosophical work can be written entirely in the form of jokes” Jon Long’s work addresses issues such as the pitfalls of celebrity culture, the unnecessary pressures put upon children, and the worrying state of a society that allows Jeremy Kyle to not only continue broadcasting, but to continue breathing.
Long believes that making a subject laughable helps us to remove ourselves emotionally from the issue, so that we may view it more objectively. It is also important to Long that he does so in a way that allows a large cross section of the audience to both understand and enjoy the work.
His work includes t-shirt sloganism, painting, and audio pieces. His project for this show is an installation that incorporates all of these elements and is entitled: ‘The artist’s pop-shop is void void void void’.
His hobbies include long walks on the beach and writing about himself in third person.
www.bowboy.tumblr.com
jonmarklong@yahoo.co.uk

Jon Long 

‘The artist is void void void void’, 2012

Acrylic and edding pen of canvas

40 x 75 cm

A committed subscriber to Ludwig Wittgenstein’s proposal that: “a good and serious philosophical work can be written entirely in the form of jokes” Jon Long’s work addresses issues such as the pitfalls of celebrity culture, the unnecessary pressures put upon children, and the worrying state of a society that allows Jeremy Kyle to not only continue broadcasting, but to continue breathing.

Long believes that making a subject laughable helps us to remove ourselves emotionally from the issue, so that we may view it more objectively. It is also important to Long that he does so in a way that allows a large cross section of the audience to both understand and enjoy the work.

His work includes t-shirt sloganism, painting, and audio pieces. His project for this show is an installation that incorporates all of these elements and is entitled: ‘The artist’s pop-shop is void void void void’.

His hobbies include long walks on the beach and writing about himself in third person.

www.bowboy.tumblr.com

jonmarklong@yahoo.co.uk

Kitty Junkbrother
'The Tower of Psycho Babble’ Kitty Junkbrother works on large installations, sculptures, painting and illustrative works incorporating an obsessive use of psychedelic colour, repetition and obsession. Anthropomorphic creatures, largely influenced by Japanese manga and animation, blend together in a metamorphosis of mythologies and folklores, exploring the narratives with a certain level of kitsch ‘naffness’ that reveres an appreciation of nostalgia.There are many references to the advent of computerization and human interaction with technology suggesting narrative to dystopian post apocalyptic cyber realities further leading to a homage to comic book culture and the concepts of far-fetched scenario and perceptive. The end result of all these elements create an orchestrated chaos of psychedelia and form to remove the spectator and perhaps more so the artist herself from the peripheral identity of conformity.
iamkategilchrist@gmail.com

Kitty Junkbrother

'The Tower of Psycho Babble’ 

Kitty Junkbrother works on large installations, sculptures, painting and illustrative works incorporating an obsessive use of psychedelic colour, repetition and obsession. Anthropomorphic creatures, largely influenced by Japanese manga and animation, blend together in a metamorphosis of mythologies and folklores, exploring the narratives with a certain level of kitsch ‘naffness’ that reveres an appreciation of nostalgia.
There are many references to the advent of computerization and human interaction with technology suggesting narrative to dystopian post apocalyptic cyber realities further leading to a homage to comic book culture and the concepts of far-fetched scenario and perceptive. The end result of all these elements create an orchestrated chaos of psychedelia and form to remove the spectator and perhaps more so the artist herself from the peripheral identity of conformity.

iamkategilchrist@gmail.com

(Source: cass2012catalogue, via cass2012catalogue-r-z)

Jessica Proto
'Memento Mori'
Jessica Proto is a photographer that started her photography career in 2008. Photography is a discipline that has interested her for some years now because as she says “it’s a beautiful way to express your self and capture special moments and memories”.
In the “Memento Mori” project she has used an actual body bag to illustrate death and issues relating to dead people, but she explains, “because of how it’s illustrated, the photos can look very funny, but the theme itself is rather important and vital.” Proto’s research indicates that the phrase “Memento Mori” comes from Latin and is translated as “Remember your mortality”, “Remember you must die” or “Remember you will die”. The phrase often refers to a genre of different artworks that share the same purpose, which is to remind people of their mortality.
Proto’s photographs reflect upon the normalization of death in today’s society and how accustomed people are to it through the mass media. She argues that we, the spectators, have become impassive when reading and hearing about someone dying. Even if death is a natural occurrence in life, it doesn’t mean that we shouldn’t be careful about its consequences.
jespro.wordpress.com
jes.proto@gmail.com

Jessica Proto

'Memento Mori'

Jessica Proto is a photographer that started her photography career in 2008. Photography is a discipline that has interested her for some years now because as she says “it’s a beautiful way to express your self and capture special moments and memories”.

In the “Memento Mori” project she has used an actual body bag to illustrate death and issues relating to dead people, but she explains, “because of how it’s illustrated, the photos can look very funny, but the theme itself is rather important and vital.” Proto’s research indicates that the phrase “Memento Mori” comes from Latin and is translated as “Remember your mortality”, “Remember you must die” or “Remember you will die”. The phrase often refers to a genre of different artworks that share the same purpose, which is to remind people of their mortality.

Proto’s photographs reflect upon the normalization of death in today’s society and how accustomed people are to it through the mass media. She argues that we, the spectators, have become impassive when reading and hearing about someone dying. Even if death is a natural occurrence in life, it doesn’t mean that we shouldn’t be careful about its consequences.

jespro.wordpress.com

jes.proto@gmail.com

Jane Prentice
'Sisters'
60 x 36cm
My paintings are the spaces where my subjects live. The people in my paintings are psychological landscapes, shaped by their life experience. My practice is about relating their narratives and translating their condition of being, using the medium of paint. I do not aspire to photorealism, rather to convey a reality about my subjects using expressive and intuitive marks, often led by the medium itself. My work is experiential rather than theoretically perceived. Where my paintings have groups of people, although they each have an individual narrative, these tend to be sub- texts to a wider narrative which is based in social commentary.
janeprentice345@yahoo.co.uk

Jane Prentice

'Sisters'

60 x 36cm

My paintings are the spaces where my subjects live. The people in my paintings are psychological landscapes, shaped by their life experience. My practice is about relating their narratives and translating their condition of being, using the medium of paint. I do not aspire to photorealism, rather to convey a reality about my subjects using expressive and intuitive marks, often led by the medium itself. My work is experiential rather than theoretically perceived. Where my paintings have groups of people, although they each have an individual narrative, these tend to be sub- texts to a wider narrative which is based in social commentary.

janeprentice345@yahoo.co.uk

Michael Piper
'Streets in the Sky'
Scott House C Type Matt Print, 40x30 Mounted on Dibond.
Michael’s current work are typologies which combines two subjects:- The homeless and social housing. Separately the projects were named Hundreds of Windows Hundreds of Lives and The Look Just like You. While shooting he realised that they were linked and decided to combine both projects under the title Street’s in the Sky. They Look Just Like You is an project inspired by the work of Jacob Riis, Michael has tried not to glamourise or turn his sitters into heroic examples of the poor.  He has tried to hunanise his sitters by engaging and photographing them in their own environment. 
Hundreds of Windows Hundreds of Lives looks at social housing namely tower blocks, influenced by the Bermd and Hilla Becher who captured disappearing architecture in Europe and America. Although tower blocks are not completely disappearing from the landscape, Michael feels that these brutalist structures which where once thought of as the new utopian solution to help London finally end its housing shortage have become more associated with crime, poor living conditions, anti social behavior and reported as not fit for purpose unless inhabited by the upwardly mobile. London based photographer Michael Piper combines together projects dealing with social housing and homelessness.
In his practice he address two questions; that social housing is seen as inferior, and the other question being are they still useful for all members of society? Michael’s  homeless images reference the work of earlier documentary photographer’s such as Jacob Riis. Michael has added a modern contemporary twist by shooting using modern colour media. 
www.michaelpiper.co.uk
Photomichaelpiper@gmail.com

Michael Piper

'Streets in the Sky'

Scott House C Type Matt Print, 40x30 Mounted on Dibond.

Michael’s current work are typologies which combines two subjects:- The homeless and social housing. Separately the projects were named Hundreds of Windows Hundreds of Lives and The Look Just like You. While shooting he realised that they were linked and decided to combine both projects under the title Street’s in the Sky. They Look Just Like You is an project inspired by the work of Jacob Riis, Michael has tried not to glamourise or turn his sitters into heroic examples of the poor.  He has tried to hunanise his sitters by engaging and photographing them in their own environment. 

Hundreds of Windows Hundreds of Lives looks at social housing namely tower blocks, influenced by the Bermd and Hilla Becher who captured disappearing architecture in Europe and America. Although tower blocks are not completely disappearing from the landscape, Michael feels that these brutalist structures which where once thought of as the new utopian solution to help London finally end its housing shortage have become more associated with crime, poor living conditions, anti social behavior and reported as not fit for purpose unless inhabited by the upwardly mobile. London based photographer Michael Piper combines together projects dealing with social housing and homelessness.

In his practice he address two questions; that social housing is seen as inferior, and the other question being are they still useful for all members of society? Michael’s  homeless images reference the work of earlier documentary photographer’s such as Jacob Riis. Michael has added a modern contemporary twist by shooting using modern colour media. 

www.michaelpiper.co.uk

Photomichaelpiper@gmail.com

Melissa Pender
‘New River Dissolving’ 2012
Photopolymer Etching
40 x 36 cm
Utopian ideas are intrinsic to the work of Melissa Pender. Her practice is about issues that interest her in a political sense, specifically ideas of public and private space. These concerns focus on the tension between the modernist dream and the reality of the current housing crisis. Her work includes camera-less photography, painting, screen prints and etchings. The artist is both attracted to modernist architecture with its historical promise and questions how these ideas fit into the landscape of London today. She has investigated a housing estate - The New River Development in North London. The modernist style of architecture used in the estate can be seen as nostalgic and the artist uses pinhole camera- less photography techniques to represent a type of aesthetic production. The photo-etchings reveal a fragmentary existence; a slowing down of time and the resulting images might be appearing or gradually evolving. The images capture a place that is familiar but seem caught between a description and an imagined existence.
www.melissapender.com
mpender1@hotmail.com

Melissa Pender

‘New River Dissolving’ 2012

Photopolymer Etching

40 x 36 cm

Utopian ideas are intrinsic to the work of Melissa Pender. Her practice is about issues that interest her in a political sense, specifically ideas of public and private space. These concerns focus on the tension between the modernist dream and the reality of the current housing crisis. Her work includes camera-less photography, painting, screen prints and etchings. The artist is both attracted to modernist architecture with its historical promise and questions how these ideas fit into the landscape of London today. She has investigated a housing estate - The New River Development in North London. The modernist style of architecture used in the estate can be seen as nostalgic and the artist uses pinhole camera- less photography techniques to represent a type of aesthetic production. The photo-etchings reveal a fragmentary existence; a slowing down of time and the resulting images might be appearing or gradually evolving. The images capture a place that is familiar but seem caught between a description and an imagined existence.

www.melissapender.com

mpender1@hotmail.com

Robyn Peatfield
'Love & Discipline'
04:00
Love & Disipline is a video short, filmed and directed by installation artist Robyn Peatfield. Using the medium and influences of the times and era in which she is most interested in, being underground fashion, music and lifestyle. This 4 minute film celebrates the art of rebellion, obnoxious revelling and the feminism of today. Using herself as the starring role, and creating another character of a seedy nature,using locations such as back alleys and toilets. The outcome however not portraying herself as the submissive one, but highly confident with body image and private lifestyle. Steering away from taboos, but adopting the cliché in a tongue and cheek manner. The video itself is highly influenced by the late Leigh Bowery, the switch of revealing costumes and bondage props, almost a shrine and rememberence of revolutionary years. 

Robyn Peatfield

'Love & Discipline'

04:00

Love & Disipline is a video short, filmed and directed by installation artist Robyn Peatfield. Using the medium and influences of the times and era in which she is most interested in, being underground fashion, music and lifestyle. This 4 minute film celebrates the art of rebellion, obnoxious revelling and the feminism of today. Using herself as the starring role, and creating another character of a seedy nature,using locations such as back alleys and toilets. The outcome however not portraying herself as the submissive one, but highly confident with body image and private lifestyle. Steering away from taboos, but adopting the cliché in a tongue and cheek manner. The video itself is highly influenced by the late Leigh Bowery, the switch of revealing costumes and bondage props, almost a shrine and rememberence of revolutionary years. 

Hannah Ellen Patching
'Sleep it off Lady’
Chip board, Enamel paint, Plaster, Potplant, Placticine, Hanging Basket, Hat Stand
An elusive marriage of literary references and sculptural mannerisms, Hannah Patching’s practice navigates the accoutrement of women’s lives and investigates social relations through ornament. 
Trinket, knick-knack, bauble; these are words which tickle the tongue when browsing the ceramic things which clutter Patching’s installations; things which smell of cheap museum shops and sound like the clatter of tourist pennies. But does this debased vocabulary belie the cultural significance of such objects? Memento, souvenir, keepsake; perhaps this trinity is more appropriate for it hints at use which strives beyond mere tinsel. But if mementos, mementos of what and mementos of whom?
hannahpatching/blogspot.co.uk
hannah.e.patching@gmail.com

Hannah Ellen Patching

'Sleep it off Lady’

Chip board, Enamel paint, Plaster, Potplant, Placticine, Hanging Basket, Hat Stand

An elusive marriage of literary references and sculptural mannerisms, Hannah Patching’s practice navigates the accoutrement of women’s lives and investigates social relations through ornament. 

Trinket, knick-knack, bauble; these are words which tickle the tongue when browsing the ceramic things which clutter Patching’s installations; things which smell of cheap museum shops and sound like the clatter of tourist pennies. But does this debased vocabulary belie the cultural significance of such objects? Memento, souvenir, keepsake; perhaps this trinity is more appropriate for it hints at use which strives beyond mere tinsel. But if mementos, mementos of what and mementos of whom?

hannahpatching/blogspot.co.uk

hannah.e.patching@gmail.com

Even Ovnan
'Chair upside down, outside…'
Project “Inverted”, is first and foremost about political corruption, but still carries large amounts of creativity and photographic thinking. Even is playing a lot with the idea of distraction and curiosity, which is a key factor in the photos presented. He also plays with the illusion of being able to create something unknown into something known by means of associations and psychological games. The political message deals with hypocrisy, with a view to a freer society desire. Where rules do not necessarily are to be broken, but maintained in loosened reins, and freer sense.
http://evenovnan.com
even@evenovnan.com

Even Ovnan

'Chair upside down, outside…'

Project “Inverted”, is first and foremost about political corruption, but still carries large amounts of creativity and photographic thinking. Even is playing a lot with the idea of distraction and curiosity, which is a key factor in the photos presented. He also plays with the illusion of being able to create something unknown into something known by means of associations and psychological games. The political message deals with hypocrisy, with a view to a freer society desire. Where rules do not necessarily are to be broken, but maintained in loosened reins, and freer sense.

http://evenovnan.com

even@evenovnan.com

Gunhild Martinsen Ohna
'Virtual Killer'
C – Type Print
100 x 70 cm
Gunhild Martinsen Ohna creates artistic photography that simulates reality. Her work consists of a series of images where each image is constructed of multiple images. The work is based on different horrible, religious stories that narrate incidents of manslaughter cases in a kitsch way through the killer’s point of view. With this perspective she enters a modern view of an old and traditional theme with a new problematic area: “Virtual killing in a virtual world of gaming”. As an artist she is looking at problematic areas in society. Especially the role of religion in our modern world is a complex and difficult area that I feel should be more enlightened. As she is showing the darker side of religion she raises the question, “Why does society censure stories?” Her works talk about notions relating to the moral lines of gaming and the idea of people engaging in killing in the virtual world. Where is the border between reality and virtuality?” As a videogame she want the viewers to “see” her work, but to interact with it so they feel like they are not just viewing the act of something but almost perpetuating it, as if they were a virtual killer.
www.gmohna.com

Gunhild Martinsen Ohna

'Virtual Killer'

C – Type Print

100 x 70 cm

Gunhild Martinsen Ohna creates artistic photography that simulates reality. Her work consists of a series of images where each image is constructed of multiple images. The work is based on different horrible, religious stories that narrate incidents of manslaughter cases in a kitsch way through the killer’s point of view. With this perspective she enters a modern view of an old and traditional theme with a new problematic area: “Virtual killing in a virtual world of gaming”. As an artist she is looking at problematic areas in society. Especially the role of religion in our modern world is a complex and difficult area that I feel should be more enlightened. As she is showing the darker side of religion she raises the question, “Why does society censure stories?” Her works talk about notions relating to the moral lines of gaming and the idea of people engaging in killing in the virtual world. Where is the border between reality and virtuality?” As a videogame she want the viewers to “see” her work, but to interact with it so they feel like they are not just viewing the act of something but almost perpetuating it, as if they were a virtual killer.

www.gmohna.com

Karima Ockba
'Jaded alice'
Oil on Canvas
38 x 38
This art project takes you the viewer into a grey windowless life where I had only my imagination to play with. It’s a journey of survival from childhood to a completely new struggle for survival in adulthood. The artwork adorned on the walls is my imagination as a 9-year-old child, where there was no TV, no Radio and very little food or sunlight. Where the fear of chemical weapons and the acrid stench of burning oil fields were the only inspiration I had to feed my senses and imagination. At the end of this corridor you’ll find a projected image surrounded by further artwork depicting my life as a modern day Muslim girl, alone in a big city, away from family and broke, fighting for survival to accomplish her new dreams to study Art in London. 
Art to me is more than just an expression; I have sacrificed my morals, my body and my soul. In the art space there will be large collages about 8x4. And a projector playing a video I had made up appropriate for the subject, and a few bunny lamps that represent the innocent and sexual side of myself. It will all be put in to a narrow small corridor shaped boxed that will be dark and dull to represent the claustrophobic environment I lived in during the Kuwait/Iraq war.
karimaockba@yahoo.co.uk

Karima Ockba

'Jaded alice'

Oil on Canvas

38 x 38

This art project takes you the viewer into a grey windowless life where I had only my imagination to play with. It’s a journey of survival from childhood to a completely new struggle for survival in adulthood. The artwork adorned on the walls is my imagination as a 9-year-old child, where there was no TV, no Radio and very little food or sunlight. Where the fear of chemical weapons and the acrid stench of burning oil fields were the only inspiration I had to feed my senses and imagination. At the end of this corridor you’ll find a projected image surrounded by further artwork depicting my life as a modern day Muslim girl, alone in a big city, away from family and broke, fighting for survival to accomplish her new dreams to study Art in London.

Art to me is more than just an expression; I have sacrificed my morals, my body and my soul. In the art space there will be large collages about 8x4. And a projector playing a video I had made up appropriate for the subject, and a few bunny lamps that represent the innocent and sexual side of myself. It will all be put in to a narrow small corridor shaped boxed that will be dark and dull to represent the claustrophobic environment I lived in during the Kuwait/Iraq war.

karimaockba@yahoo.co.uk

Thomas O’Ryan
'Audrey's Boobs'
Oil on canvas
My work aims to shed light on how modern technology in the ‘Information age’ has distorted how we perceive things, both physically and emotionally. It points out the flaws in our living habits and social constructs created by mass media and mainstream technology, and deconstructs them in a purposefully ironic and unforgiving manner; much like the media circus itself. The work is self knowingly rejecting accepted contemporary values and is intentionally iconoclastic in the way that it deals with its conventional subject matter. Adopting this tone, which is born out of my own disbelief and disillusion with many aspects of consumerist society, gives the work a brash but playful quality. This allows the viewer to not only laugh at the brazen, technophobic opinions of my adopted artist persona, but to consider them as well.
Contextually, the project is set upon the background of today: The ‘Digital age’. An age in which tangible, soulful technology and creative independent media are rapidly becoming extinct. From these realisations a nameless persona was formed; a staunch and reclusive technophobe, whom I channelled when writing and painting. There is an air of nostalgia in the work, a pining for a romanticised image of life in the past – without the constant distraction of social networking/gaming/mobilecommunication/television. My denial and rejection of these conventions of modern society convey a Punk or anti-establishment ethos and this is also apparent in the work through the appropriation and defacement of renowned iconography, which I have ‘borrowed’ as a vehicle for my themes.

Thomas O’Ryan

'Audrey's Boobs'

Oil on canvas

My work aims to shed light on how modern technology in the ‘Information age’ has distorted how we perceive things, both physically and emotionally. It points out the flaws in our living habits and social constructs created by mass media and mainstream technology, and deconstructs them in a purposefully ironic and unforgiving manner; much like the media circus itself. The work is self knowingly rejecting accepted contemporary values and is intentionally iconoclastic in the way that it deals with its conventional subject matter. Adopting this tone, which is born out of my own disbelief and disillusion with many aspects of consumerist society, gives the work a brash but playful quality. This allows the viewer to not only laugh at the brazen, technophobic opinions of my adopted artist persona, but to consider them as well.

Contextually, the project is set upon the background of today: The ‘Digital age’. An age in which tangible, soulful technology and creative independent media are rapidly becoming extinct. From these realisations a nameless persona was formed; a staunch and reclusive technophobe, whom I channelled when writing and painting. There is an air of nostalgia in the work, a pining for a romanticised image of life in the past – without the constant distraction of social networking/gaming/mobilecommunication/television. My denial and rejection of these conventions of modern society convey a Punk or anti-establishment ethos and this is also apparent in the work through the appropriation and defacement of renowned iconography, which I have ‘borrowed’ as a vehicle for my themes.

Fiona Nusum
‘All that glitters is…’
Screen Print
50 x 70cm
Fiona Nusum works as a printmaker developing her artistic ability through screen-printing. She has well constituted frameworks that focus on the theme of defamiliarization indicated by aspects of identity and perception through comparisons and juxtaposition. This artistic technique forces the audience to see common things in an unfamiliar or odd way. The artist’s series of hand-finished prints titled ‘Disposition’ capture the technical versatility and physical characteristics of screen-printing as well as the temperament of subjects. She looks at the role of appearance and identity closely linked with fashion and stereotypical relationships and perceptions between the two elements. Nusum is inspired by the power of imagination and its ability to transcend circumstance and reality, underlining the effects of re-appropriated material that create alternative contexts.
As a practitioner, the artist hopes to challenge the viewer by including evocative components, which question depicted authority. The viewer is forced to reassess the way in which they view the work and to decide what elements are dominant, if any at all, and where and why our attention is drawn to certain areas. They will become aware of the familiarity within the work and their own private connection, while evolving an irregular insight and transforming their initial perception. 
fiona_nusum@hotmail.com

Fiona Nusum

‘All that glitters is…’

Screen Print

50 x 70cm

Fiona Nusum works as a printmaker developing her artistic ability through screen-printing. She has well constituted frameworks that focus on the theme of defamiliarization indicated by aspects of identity and perception through comparisons and juxtaposition. This artistic technique forces the audience to see common things in an unfamiliar or odd way. The artist’s series of hand-finished prints titled ‘Disposition’ capture the technical versatility and physical characteristics of screen-printing as well as the temperament of subjects. She looks at the role of appearance and identity closely linked with fashion and stereotypical relationships and perceptions between the two elements. Nusum is inspired by the power of imagination and its ability to transcend circumstance and reality, underlining the effects of re-appropriated material that create alternative contexts.

As a practitioner, the artist hopes to challenge the viewer by including evocative components, which question depicted authority. The viewer is forced to reassess the way in which they view the work and to decide what elements are dominant, if any at all, and where and why our attention is drawn to certain areas. They will become aware of the familiarity within the work and their own private connection, while evolving an irregular insight and transforming their initial perception. 

fiona_nusum@hotmail.com

About:

CASS 2012 Ba Fine Art Degree Show
Online Catalogue

Gallery Preview Night 11th June 2012
Private View 12th June 2012
Open Daily 12th-17th June 2012